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    Navigate Your Foot Journey

    Newark Walks: The Alt Edition

    Newark has it’s own walking trail app, did you know that? But if you flaneurs want to stray from the trail, this is the Alt edition. Flânerie is arguably the antithesis of today’s heavily mediated world of advertising algorithms and GPS routes. As a flaneur in Newark, I offer you some of the pleasures of my walking, but only as a starting point. Like Chet Baker said, let’s get lost.

    Brick House

    At one corner of Independence Park, created by Olmstead himself in 1895, a family sets up my all time favorite ice cart. It is a lovely thing, a large, dramatic, ice- grinding wheel made of cast iron parts, painted jaunty colors. Get some shaved ice, flavored to your liking, from the grave, but friendly Peruvian lady all in pink. You will find the right corner, Van Buren and Walnut, by sound, as the wheel works the ice.

    Comfortable Seating

    If you’re in the mood, hang out with the cool kids at the 24-hour crepe shop at Adams and Walnut. Please note: I think it’s more like a 22 ½ hour crepe shop, they close sometimes when they are so moved.  Then move on towards downtown on Elm Street. Some of my building crushes are on Elm: little runts, tiny brick structures that were no doubt a family’s crowning achievement, larger triple deckers of the dark red brick that is so distinctive to our city, and a few unusual mansard roofs here and there. Just before you cross the tracks, pause near Railroad Avenue and Oliver Street and know that artist-founded spaces like the Fringe, and the Works used to be near. Newark is an old city and the grid has been reworked many many times. A street named Lum Lane used to exist nearby. 

    Just behind QXT’s there is a short residential block distinguished by resident’s fantastic approach to urban gardening, no object is too odd to have flowers thrive in it here!

    If you’re in the mood, hang out with the cool kids at the 24-hour crepe shop at Adams and Walnut. Please note: I think it’s more like a 22 ½ hour crepe shop, they close sometimes when they are so moved.  Then move on towards downtown on Elm Street. Some of my building crushes are on Elm: little runts, tiny brick structures that were no doubt a family’s crowning achievement, larger triple deckers of the dark red brick that is so distinctive to our city, and a few unusual mansard roofs here and there. Just before you cross the tracks, pause near Railroad Avenue and Oliver Street and know that artist-founded spaces like the Fringe, and the Works used to be near. Newark is an old city and the grid has been reworked many many times. A street named Lum Lane used to exist nearby. 

    Clothes

    Art 248

    Cut over to Halsey Street and maybe you will find, like I did, one of Newark Downtown District’s parklets. Have a coffee and take in the afternoon sun, then head over to Memories of Soul for tunes, and Dan’s Hats and Caps. The immersive combination of these two “old school” shops works every time. Then, properly styled in more ways than one, you can stroll to Market and Washington, and from there round from Washington to Central to Broad, and in order, take in arts experiences at: Gallery Aferro, Index Art Center, Newark Museum, Aljira, a Center for Contemporary Art, and Newark Print Shop and Paul Robeson Galleries at Express Newark.

    Clothing

    Express Newark. More can be learned about Newark galleries with the https://www.newarkhappening.com/about/download-gallery-guide/ Then, across the street from Newark Print Shop and Paul Robeson Galleries at Express Newark, I suggest taking the Newark City Subway from Military Park Station to Branch Brook Park, and strolling some more.


    Evonne M. Davis and Emma Wilcox are working artists and cofounders of a Newark alternative arts nonprofit. Begun in 2003, Gallery Aferro offers exhibitions featuring local, national and international artists, a wide range of public events, a year-round studio residency program, educational offerings, group tours, a publication line, a gift shop and public art initiatives.